05
DAYS LEFT

Registration window open (1 Jan - end of Feb)

If you use personal data in your work you are legally obliged to register during January and February each year.
NEW REGISTRATION? View guidance and create new registration here
EXISTING REGISTRATION? Sign-in to Registrations Portal here
 

WARRO

Discover ‘Warro goes on an adventure’ – a book that introduces children and young people to the world of data.

In September 2023 the ODPA published a children’s book called ‘Warro goes on an adventure’.

ODPA outreach officer Kirsty Bougourd talking to Year 4 children after reading 'Warro' with them (September 2023) Why write a book?
Stories play a key role in helping the ODPA achieve its strategic aim and statutory obligation under section 61 of the Law ‘to promote public awareness of risks, rules, safeguards and rights in relation to processing, especially in relation to children’.

Data and its protection is something that impacts us all, regardless of age. Whilst it is a wordy piece of legal text, the principles and rights it seeks to uphold are, at their core, simply about treating people with respect, dignity and fairness.

We need to communicate these issues in ways that are meaningful and accessible for the whole community. Children and young people are impacted just as adults are. They are also our future technologists, politicians, innovators. Stories can be a powerful communication tool, so we hope this book will encourage interest and awareness in our younger citizens, to benefit each child individually and our community collectively.

Discover Warro’s story
The book, ‘Warro goes on an adventure’ introduces children to a loveable character (a bear called Warro) as she journeys through a world full of personal data. Her adventure brings to life the challenges that exist in our data-hungry world, raising awareness about the risks children face and the rewards of treating personal information respectfully.

The book was written by ODPA outreach officer Kirsty Bougourd, a trained teacher who has extensive experience working with child literacy. It was illustrated by our former Commissioner Emma Martins.

It introduces youngsters to the concept of personal data and how it can impact our lives.

What’s in a name?
The names of the two characters in the story ‘Warro’ and ‘Bijou’ are significant for the following reasons: -

  • Warro’ means “Hi” in Guernsey’s local language Guernésiais.
    The character was given this name because, like ‘Warro’, many question words (Who? What? Why? Where?) begin with the letter ‘W’. The book aims to encourage primary-school aged children to think about the data they share by asking 4 simple questions, “Who is asking, what do they want to know, why do they want it, where will it go?”
  • ‘Bijou’ is the blue tit bird that accompanies Warro and helps her on her journey.
    His name is a reference to Project Bijou, the ODPA’s social initiative which uses the power of storytelling to engage people and share experiences related to ethical data use. Bijou is a blue tit because these birds are known for their ability to share information with each other for the benefit of their whole species – see this short video for more.

Launch and distribution

  • The book was launched at a public reading by ODPA outreach officer Kirsty Bougourd in September 2023, at Guille-Alles Library. She is pictured above during the Q&A with the children afterwards.  
  • The book was distributed to all Year 4 children across the Bailiwick of Guernsey as part of the ODPA's activities to mark World Children's Day (20 November 2023).
  • You can order Warro via the local publisher Blue Ormer. It is also available via Amazon, Hatchards, and Waterstones. All profits go to Bailiwick charities. 

Here's a glimpse of the book: 



Quotes on the power of stories: 
• “Because stories are important. People think that stories are shaped by people. In fact, it's the other way around.” – Terry Pratchett
• “The most powerful person in the world is the storyteller.” - Steve Jobs
• “Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.” - Margaret Mead